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Vertical Greenery: 17 Top Tall Succulent Plants for Your Home

a tall jade plant in a living room

In the world of indoor and outdoor gardening, succulents have carved out a special niche for themselves, beloved for their low maintenance and stunning variety. Among these, tall succulent plants offer a unique aesthetic, adding a touch of vertical greenery to any space.

These towering beauties not only serve as natural sculptures but also purify the air and bring a piece of the outdoors inside. This article explores the top tall succulent plants that can transform your home into a lush, vertical garden.

Understanding Tall Succulent Plants

Tall growing succulents are a fascinating group of plants that exhibit a range of unique characteristics making them well-suited for both indoor and outdoor gardening. These plants are not only admired for their striking vertical presence but also for their resilience and adaptability.

Some defining characteristics of tall succulents include:

  • Drought Resistance: They are able to store water in their leaves, stems, or roots, which allows them to survive and thrive in arid conditions where other plants might perish.
  • Structural Forms: These can range from the columnar and tree-like shapes of certain Euphorbia species to the rosette formations of large Aloe varieties.
  • Growth Habits: Some tall succulents, like certain types of cacti and Euphorbia, grow upright and can reach impressive heights, often standing several feet tall. Others, such as some Agave species, may not be as tall but spread outwards, creating a large vertical presence through their width and the span of their leaves.
  • Thick, Fleshy Parts: In tall succulents, this feature can be observed in their substantial stems, large leaves, or even swollen root systems.
  • Adaptability: While they prefer bright, indirect light and well-draining soil, many can tolerate lower light conditions and less-than-ideal soil types.
  • Low Maintenance: They require minimal watering, are less prone to pests and diseases compared to many other plant types, and generally need little in the way of fertilization.

The Tallest Succulent

African baobabs in the African plains

African baobabs (Adansonia digitata) are among the most iconic and distinctive trees of the African savannah and are classed as succulents because its trunk is more than 80% water. Known for their remarkable size and longevity, these trees are not only a symbol of the African landscape but also hold significant ecological and cultural value.

The most striking feature of the African baobab is its enormous trunk, which can reach diameters of up to 10 meters (33 feet) and heights of 5 to 25 meters (16 to 82 feet). The trunk is often bottle-shaped, swollen, or fluted, and can store large quantities of water to sustain the tree during arid conditions.

17 Types of Succulents That Grow Tall

1. African Milk Tree (Euphorbia Trigona)

african milk tree

The African Milk Tree is a popular choice for adding architectural interest to indoor spaces due to its striking, vertical growth and low-maintenance nature. It is well-suited for use as a standalone specimen in floor pots or as part of a mixed succulent display. In warmer climates, it can also be grown outdoors in rock gardens or as part of a drought-tolerant landscape.

Also known as the Good Luck Cactus, it is not a true cactus but a member of the Euphorbiaceae family. This plant is popular among gardeners and houseplant enthusiasts for its unique appearance and ease of care.

Quick Overview:

  • It has a vertical, upright growth habit, typically reaching heights of 1.8 to 2.7 meters (6 to 9 feet) when grown indoors, though it can grow taller in its natural habitat.
  • The plant is primarily green, but its stems can have a reddish or purplish hue, adding to its ornamental appeal.
  • It thrives in bright, indirect light but can tolerate some direct sun. However, too much direct sunlight can scorch its leaves and stems.
  • This succulent is drought-tolerant, requiring minimal watering.
  • It prefers warm temperatures and should be protected from cold drafts and temperatures below 10°C (50°F).

2. Snake Plant (Sansevieria)

a 4 foot tall snake plant
4 foot tall Snake Plant

This is a highly durable and popular succulent known for its air-purifying qualities and striking appearance. Its hardy nature and architectural form make it a favorite among both novice and experienced gardeners.

Snake Plants are most notable for their long, upright, sword-like leaves that can vary in color from deep green to light gray-green and may have striped or mottled patterns. Some varieties also feature yellow or white edging and are easy tall growing succulents.

Quick Overview:

  • Depending on the variety, the leaves can range from a few inches to up to 8 feet in height.
  • Snake Plants are highly adaptable in terms of light requirements. They thrive in anything from direct sunlight to low light conditions, making them suitable for various indoor settings.
  • As a succulent, the Snake Plant stores water in its leaves and prefers dry conditions. Overwatering can lead to root rot, so it’s important to let the soil dry out completely between waterings.
  • It prefers average room temperatures between 60-80°F (16-27°C) but can tolerate a wider range, making it very versatile in different indoor environments.

3. Aloe Vera (Barbadensis Miller)

aloe vera

Aloe Vera is a succulent plant species from the genus Aloe. It’s widely recognized for its therapeutic properties and is extensively used in the cosmetic, pharmaceutical, and food industries.

The edges of the leaves are serrated and have small, white teeth or spikes, which are characteristic of the Aloe species. The plant produces flowers in summer on a spike up to 35 inches (90 cm) tall. The flowers are yellow, tubular, and pendulous, adding an ornamental aspect to the plant when in bloom.

Quick Overview:

  • They feature a rosette of thick, fleshy leaves that can grow up to 3 feet (90 cm) in length.
  • Aloe vera plants prefer bright, indirect sunlight or artificial lighting. While they are tolerant of various lighting conditions, too much direct sunlight can cause their leaves to brown.
  • As a succulent, Aloe vera stores water in its leaves and requires minimal watering. The soil should be allowed to dry out completely between waterings to prevent root rot.
  • It thrives in temperatures between 55-80°F (13-27°C) and can be sensitive to extreme cold.

4. Jade Plant (Crassula Ovata)

a jade plant on a windowsill

Often called the “money tree,” this plant can grow tall and wide, with woody stems and oval-shaped leaves. It is a popular succulent native to South Africa and Mozambique and is cherished in homes and gardens for its ornamental beauty and symbolic significance.

The Jade Plant is characterized by its thick, shiny, smooth leaves that are a rich jade green color. The leaves are oval-shaped and can sometimes have a red tinge to the edges, especially when exposed to sunlight or during cooler temperatures.

Under the right conditions, usually in the winter, the Jade Plant can produce small, star-shaped white or pink flowers in clusters, adding to its appeal.

Quick Overview:

  • This tall growing succulent has a thick, woody stem that gives it a tree-like appearance as it matures. It can grow up to 3-6 feet (about 1-2 meters) in height indoors, although it grows slowly and takes years to reach its full size.
  • Jade Plants prefer bright light and can benefit from some direct sunlight. However, too much direct sun in hot climates can scorch the leaves, so it’s important to find a balance.
  • As with most succulents, the Jade Plant stores water in its leaves and is drought-tolerant. Overwatering can lead to root rot, so it’s essential to let the soil dry out completely between waterings.
  • Jade Plants prefer average room temperatures between 65-75°F (18-24°C) during the day and cooler temperatures at night. They are not frost-tolerant and should be protected from temperatures below 50°F (10°C).

5. Madagascar Palm (Pachypodium Lamerei)

Madagascar palm

Despite its common name, the Madagascar Palm is not a true palm but a tall succulent plant belonging to the Apocynaceae family. Native to Madagascar, this plant is known for its striking appearance and is popular among succulent enthusiasts and collectors.

The Madagascar Palm features a thick, spiny trunk that serves as a water reservoir during droughts. The trunk is covered in sharp, needle-like thorns, providing a unique texture and appearance. At the top of the trunk, the plant produces a rosette of long, slender leaves that are dark green and glossy.

In its natural habitat and under optimal conditions, the Madagascar Palm can produce large, fragrant, white flowers with a yellow center. These flowers are quite showy and add to the plant’s ornamental appeal.

Quick Overview:

  • This is a slow growing plant that grows up to 19 feet tall outdoors and 6 feet inside.
  • This plant thrives in full sun to partial shade. Ample sunlight is crucial for its growth and health, especially if you’re aiming for it to flower.
  • Being a succulent, the Madagascar Palm is drought-tolerant and requires minimal watering. Overwatering can be detrimental, so it’s important to allow the soil to dry out completely between waterings.
  • The Madagascar Palm prefers warm temperatures and is not frost-tolerant. It should be protected from temperatures below 50°F (10°C). In cooler climates, it’s often grown as a houseplant or in a greenhouse.

6. Candelabra Spurge (Euphorbia Ingens)

candelabra spurge

Also known as the Candelabra Tree or Naboom, this is a striking succulent native to the dry areas of southern Africa. Part of the diverse Euphorbiaceae family, it’s known for its distinctive, tree-like structure that resembles the shape of a candelabra, hence its name.

It has a thick, green trunk and branches that grow upwards in a pattern that mimics the shape of a candelabra. The branches are segmented and bear pairs of sharp thorns along the ridges, which provide the plant with a formidable defense mechanism against herbivores.

The Candelabra Spurge produces small, yellow flowers within cup-shaped structures called cyathia, which are typical of the Euphorbia genus. These are often found at the tips of the branches and can add a subtle splash of color to the plant.

Quick Overview:

  • The Candelabra Spurge can grow into a large, tree-like succulent, reaching heights of up to 12 meters (about 40 feet) in its natural habitat.
  • This plant thrives in bright, direct sunlight, which is essential for its health and growth. It’s well-suited to outdoor cultivation in sunny climates or as a striking indoor plant in a sunny spot.
  • The Candelabra Spurge is drought-tolerant and requires minimal watering.
  • It prefers warm temperatures and is not frost-tolerant. In cooler climates, it should be grown in a container that can be moved indoors during colder months.

7. Elephant Bush (Portulacaria Afra)

elephant bush

The Elephant Bush (Portulacaria afra), also known as the Dwarf Jade Plant, Spekboom, or Porkbush, is a succulent native to South Africa. This plant is admired for its vibrant green foliage and is popular in gardens and homes for its ease of care and environmental benefits.

The Elephant Bush is characterized by small, glossy, rounded leaves that are a vibrant green color, which can sometimes turn reddish along the edges when exposed to full sun or during stress conditions. It has reddish-brown stems that become woody as the plant matures, supporting the dense foliage to create a lush, shrubby appearance.

Quick Overview:

  • In its natural habitat, the Elephant Bush can grow into a large, sprawling shrub or small tree, reaching heights of up to 2-5 meters (6.5-16 feet). However, when grown as a houseplant or in gardens outside its native range, it typically remains much smaller.
  • This succulent prefers bright, indirect light but can tolerate direct sunlight, especially in the cooler hours of the morning or late afternoon. Too much harsh sun can scorch the leaves, while too little light can cause leggy growth.
  • The Elephant Bush is drought-tolerant, storing water in its leaves like many succulents. It’s important to allow the soil to dry out completely between waterings to avoid root rot.
  • It thrives in warm environments and should be protected from temperatures below 50°F (10°C), as it is not frost-tolerant.

8. Burro’s Tail (Sedum Morganianum)

Burro's Tail

Also known as Donkey’s Tail or Lamb’s Tail, this is a popular succulent known for its distinctive trailing stems and plump, overlapping leaves. Native to southern Mexico and Honduras, this plant is a favorite among succulent enthusiasts for its unique appearance and ease of care.

The most striking feature of the Burro’s Tail are its fleshy, blue-green leaves, which are shaped like small teardrops or grapes. These leaves densely cover the long, trailing stems, giving the plant a full, cascading appearance.

Although flowering is rare, especially indoors, Burro’s Tail can produce small, pink or red star-shaped flowers at the tips of the stems during the summer months.

Quick Overview:

  • The stems are succulent and can grow quite long, up to 3 feet (90 centimeters) in length, making this plant ideal for hanging baskets where it can drape beautifully over the sides.
  • This succulent prefers bright, indirect light. While it can tolerate some direct sunlight, too much can cause the leaves to burn, so it’s best to provide some shade during the hottest parts of the day.
  • The Burro’s Tail stores water in its leaves and is drought-tolerant. Overwatering can lead to root rot, so allow the soil to dry out completely between waterings.
  • It prefers warmer temperatures and is not frost-tolerant. Keep it in temperatures above 50°F (10°C) and protect it from cold drafts.

9. Eve’s Needle (Austrocylindropuntia Subulata)

eve's needle plant in the desert

This is a striking cactus native to the high Andes of Peru and Ecuador. This plant is notable for its long, needle-like spines and cylindrical, upright stems, making it a unique addition to any cactus collection or succulent garden.

One of the distinguishing characteristics of this cactus is the presence of modified leaves, which are bright green, awl-shaped, and can grow up to 5 inches (12 cm) long. These are accompanied by long, sharp spines that emerge from areoles on the stems, adding to the plant’s dramatic appearance.

Eve’s Needle can produce large, showy flowers that are usually red or orange, adding a splash of color to the green stems. The flowers bloom from the top segments of the stems, typically during the warmer months.

Quick Overview:

  • The primary feature of the Eve’s Needle is its cylindrical, green stems that can grow quite tall, reaching up to 12 feet (3.7 meters) in height in its natural habitat, but typically remains smaller in cultivation.
  • This cactus thrives in full sun, which encourages healthy growth and flowering. It’s well-suited for outdoor gardens in sunny, arid climates or as an indoor plant in a brightly lit location.
  • As with most cacti, the Eve’s Needle is drought-tolerant and requires minimal watering. The soil should be allowed to dry out completely between waterings to prevent root rot.
  • It prefers warm temperatures and needs protection from frost. In regions with cold winters, it’s best grown in containers that can be moved indoors or provided with frost protection.

10. Ocotillo (Fouquieria Splendens)

Ocotillo (Fouquieria Splendens)
A very tall succulent plant

The Ocotillo (Fouquieria splendens), also known as the Coachwhip, Candlewood, Slimwood, or Jacob’s Staff, is a unique and striking plant native to the Sonoran and Chihuahuan deserts of the Southwestern United States and Northern Mexico. Not a true cactus, the Ocotillo is known for its long, spiny, and whip-like stems that shoot upwards and create an intriguing silhouette against the desert sky, which makes it a tall growing succulent.

The leaves of the Ocotillo are small, oval-shaped, and green, appearing along the stems shortly after rainfall. These leaves are drought-deciduous, meaning they will fall off during dry periods to conserve water.

Ocotillo (Fouquieria Splendens)

The Ocotillo produces brilliant, tubular, red or orange flowers at the tips of the stems in spring and sometimes after summer rains. These flowers are a vital nectar source for hummingbirds and other pollinators.

Quick Overview:

  • The most distinctive feature of the Ocotillo is its tall, slender, cane-like stems that can grow up to 20 feet (6 meters) in height. These stems are covered in small, backward-hooked thorns and are capable of leafing out after rainfall.
  • The Ocotillo thrives in full sun, reflecting its natural desert habitat. It requires a bright, sunny location to grow and flower successfully.
  • As a desert plant, the Ocotillo is highly drought-tolerant and requires minimal supplemental water once established. Overwatering can harm the plant, so it’s important to mimic the natural watering patterns of its native environment.
  • The Ocotillo is adapted to hot, arid climates and can withstand high temperatures. It is also cold-hardy to about 20°F (-6°C), making it suitable for desert landscapes and rock gardens in various regions.

11. Fox Tail Agave (Agave Attenuata)

Image credit: rareplant

Also known as the Dragon-Tree Agave or Swan’s Neck Agave, this is a stunning tall succulent native to the central plateau of Mexico. Unlike many agaves, this species is known for its smooth, spineless leaves and a dramatic flower spike that curves like a fox’s tail, giving the plant its common name.

Agave attenuata forms a single large rosette and does not typically produce offsets, unlike many other agave species. After flowering, which may take several years, the main rosette usually dies but is often replaced by pups from the base.

Quick Overview:

  • The leaves can grow up to 2-3 feet (60-90 cm) long and arch gracefully, creating a fountain-like effect.
  • One of the most distinctive features of this agave is its tall, curved flower spike, which can reach up to 5 feet (1.6 meters) in height. The spike bears numerous greenish-yellow flowers, attracting pollinators like bees and hummingbirds.
  • The Fox Tail Agave thrives in full sun to partial shade. While it prefers bright light, excessive direct sunlight can scorch the leaves, especially in hotter climates.
  • This agave is drought-tolerant once established but benefits from occasional watering during dry periods.
  • It is somewhat frost-sensitive and should be protected from freezing temperatures. In cooler climates, it’s best grown in containers that can be moved indoors during winter.

12. Mother of Millions (Kalanchoe Daigremontiana)

mother of millions plant

The Mother of Millions (Kalanchoe daigremontiana), also known as Devil’s Backbone, Alligator Plant, or Mexican Hat Plant, is a fascinating succulent native to Madagascar. It’s known for its unique reproductive strategy and distinctive appearance, making it an interesting yet potentially invasive species in some regions.

The Mother of Millions features long, slender, green leaves that have a unique trait – they develop tiny plantlets along their edges. These plantlets, complete with roots, can easily drop off and root themselves wherever they land, giving rise to the plant’s common name.

It produces tubular, orange to red flowers on tall, upright stalks, usually during the late fall to early winter. The flowers add an extra decorative element to the plant, although the plantlets are the more commonly observed form of reproduction.

Quick Overview:

  • The plant has a vertical growth habit with one or more central stems that can grow up to 7 feet (about 2.1 meters) tall. The stems are somewhat fleshy and can become woody at the base as the plant matures.
  • The Mother of Millions requires bright, indirect light but can tolerate some direct sunlight. Too much direct sun, however, can scorch the leaves, so it’s important to find a balance.
  • As a succulent, it prefers a “soak and dry” method of watering. Allow the soil to dry out completely between waterings to prevent root rot.
  • It prefers warm temperatures and is not frost-tolerant. Protect it from cold drafts and temperatures below 50°F (10°C).

13. Queen of the Night (Selenicereus grandiflorus)

Queen of the night plant and flower

The Night-Blooming Cereus or Queen of the Night is a captivating cactus known for its spectacular, large flowers that bloom for a single night. Native to the Antilles, Mexico, and Central America, this plant is a member of the Cactaceae family and is celebrated for its rare and stunning nocturnal flowering event.

The Queen of the Night is a climbing, sprawling, or trailing cactus with slender, green, and often branching stems. The stems can grow quite long and may require support in cultivation. They are ribbed and may bear small spines or be nearly spineless.

Quick Overview:

  • Mature plants can grow up to 10 feet tall outdoors, and the blooms can reach up to 12 inches. It will do best when grown with other plants like shrubs or trees because it is reliant on other plants for support.
  • While it appreciates bright, indirect light, the Queen of the Night also tolerates lower light conditions better than many cacti, making it suitable for indoor cultivation.
  • This cactus prefers a bit more water than the typical desert cactus but still requires well-draining soil to prevent root rot. Allow the soil to dry out partially between waterings.
  • It thrives in warm temperatures and should be protected from frost. During the winter months, cooler temperatures can help stimulate flowering.

14. Spineless Yucca (Yucca Elephantipes)

spineless yucca in a pot

Also known as the Giant Yucca or Yucca Cane, is a popular houseplant and landscape feature native to Mexico and Central America. Unlike many other yucca species, this variety is characterized by its lack of sharp spines on the tips of its leaves, making it a safer choice for indoor environments and public spaces.

The Spineless Yucca features long, arching, dark green leaves that form a dense rosette atop stout, woody stems. The leaves are broad and somewhat flexible, with a smooth margin and a pointed but not sharp tip.

It can develop thick, cane-like stems that give the plant a tree-like appearance as it matures. These stems may branch, creating multiple heads of foliage.

Quick Overview:

  • In its natural habitat, the Spineless Yucca can grow quite tall, reaching up to 30 feet (9 meters). However, when grown as a houseplant or in gardens outside its native range, it typically remains much smaller, making it suitable for indoor cultivation.
  • The Spineless Yucca thrives in bright, indirect light but can also adapt to lower light conditions. It prefers some direct sunlight, so a south or west-facing window is ideal when grown indoors.
  • This plant is drought-tolerant and requires minimal watering. Overwatering can lead to root rot, so it’s important to let the soil dry out completely between waterings.
  • It prefers warm temperatures but is quite adaptable. Protect it from extreme cold and frost, which can damage the leaves and stems.

15. Desert Rose (Adenium obesum)

desert rose

This is a striking succulent plant known for its beautiful blooms and unique, swollen stem. Native to the arid regions of Africa and the Arabian Peninsula, this plant has adapted to survive in harsh environments, making it a popular choice for gardeners looking for drought-tolerant and visually interesting specimens.

One of the most distinctive features of the Desert Rose is its caudex, or swollen stem base, which serves as a water reservoir. The stem is often bulbous at the base and tapers up to the branches, giving the plant a bonsai-like appearance.

The leaves are glossy, dark green, and spear-shaped, growing in clusters toward the ends of the branches. They may drop during periods of drought or cool temperatures as the plant goes dormant.

The Desert Rose is renowned for its showy, trumpet-shaped flowers, which can range in color from pink to red, white, and even yellow or bicolor variations. The blooms are often highlighted by a deeper-colored throat, adding to their appeal.

Quick Overview:

  • This is a slow-growing succulent with white and pink flowers and can grow up to 10 feet tall with a width of up to 5 feet.
  • The Desert Rose thrives in full sun to partial shade. It requires plenty of sunlight to bloom profusely but should be protected from the hottest afternoon sun in very warm climates.
  • This plant is drought-tolerant and susceptible to root rot if overwatered. Allow the soil to dry out completely between waterings, and reduce watering in the winter during its dormant period.
  • It prefers warm temperatures and should be protected from frost. In regions with cold winters, it’s best grown in containers that can be brought indoors.

16. Organ Pipe Cactus (Stenocereus thurberi)

an organ pipe cactus

This is a fascinating and iconic species native to the Sonoran Desert in Mexico and the United States. Named for its resemblance to a pipe organ, this cactus is known for its tall, columnar stems that grow in clusters from a single base, creating a striking natural sculpture in the desert landscape.

The stems are dark green and ribbed, with areoles that bear sharp spines. This cactus blooms at night with large, funnel-shaped flowers that are white to light pink, emitting a strong, sweet fragrance to attract nocturnal pollinators such as bats. The flowers typically appear in late spring to early summer.

Quick Overview:

  • The Organ Pipe Cactus features multiple tall, slender, upright stems that can grow up to 26 feet (8 meters) in height.
  • In cultivation, the Organ Pipe Cactus requires full sun to thrive and produce flowers.
  • It is extremely drought-tolerant and should be watered sparingly. Overwatering can lead to root rot, which is a common issue in non-native environments.
  • This cactus prefers warm temperatures and needs protection from frost. It can withstand high desert temperatures but may require some shade in the hottest parts of the day in particularly intense climates.

17. Fishhook Barrel Cactus (Ferocactus wislizenii)

a Fishhook Barrel Cactus on a bathroom shelf next to a barrel cactus

The Fishhook Barrel Cactus (Ferocactus wislizeni) is a distinctive and robust species of cactus native to the arid regions of the Southwestern United States and Northern Mexico. Known for its curved spines that resemble fishhooks, this cactus is a staple of desert landscapes and a symbol of the resilience and beauty of desert flora.

The most notable feature of this cactus is its long, curved spines that resemble the hooks used in fishing, which provide the plant with its common name. These spines can range in color from reddish to gray and serve as a defense mechanism against herbivores.

The cactus has pronounced vertical ribs that run the length of its body, with areoles (small cushion-like areas) from which the spines emerge.

Quick Overview:

  • The Fishhook Barrel Cactus typically grows cylindrical, reaching heights of up to 12 feet (3.7 meters) and diameters of about 2 feet (0.6 meters). Its size and shape can vary based on environmental conditions. However, the smaller, more common shrub versions grow up to 3 feet tall.
  • This cactus thrives in full sunlight, mirroring its natural desert habitat.
  • It requires minimal watering, with a “soak and dry” approach being optimal. Overwatering can lead to root rot, a common issue in non-native environments.
  • The Fishhook Barrel Cactus is tolerant of high temperatures but needs protection from frost, which can damage the plant.

General Tips for Tall Succulents

3 snake plants on a table
  • Adaptation: When bringing a new tall succulent into your home or moving it to a new location, it’s essential to give it time to adapt to its new environment, especially regarding light exposure.
  • Monitoring: Regularly monitor your tall succulents for signs of stress, such as yellowing leaves, dropping leaves, or sunburn, and adjust their care as needed.
  • Seasonal Adjustments: Be prepared to adjust care with the seasons, particularly watering frequency and light exposure, as indoor and outdoor conditions change.

Pruning Tall Succulents

  • Timing: The best time to prune tall succulents is during their active growing season, typically in spring or early summer. This timing allows the plant to recover and grow back healthier and more vigorous.
  • Tools: Use sharp, clean pruning shears or a knife to make clean cuts. Sterilize your tools before and after use with rubbing alcohol to prevent the spread of disease.
  • Removing Dead or Damaged Parts: Regularly inspect your succulents for dead or damaged leaves and stems. Gently remove these parts to prevent rot and disease from spreading. This also helps the plant direct its energy to new, healthy growth.
  • Shaping: To maintain or enhance the plant’s shape, carefully prune back overgrown stems or branches. Be mindful of the plant’s natural growth habit and try to maintain its characteristic form.
  • Thinning: For succulents with dense growth, thinning out some stems can improve air circulation, reducing the risk of fungal diseases. It also allows light to reach inner parts of the plant, promoting healthier growth.

How to Incorporate Tall Succulents Indoors

tall succulents in a kitchen
  • Floor Planters: Choose tall, sculptural planters that complement the natural form of the succulent. Materials like concrete, terracotta, or modern metals can make a bold statement. Position the planter in a well-lit corner or beside furniture to create a focal point.
  • Pedestal Planters: Elevate your tall succulent on a pedestal planter to give it prominence in the room. This can be particularly effective in highlighting the unique shapes and textures of the succulent’s leaves and stem.
  • Mixed Heights: Group tall succulents with shorter plants and succulents of various textures and colors to create a dynamic green corner. This diversity can mimic a natural landscape, adding depth and interest to your indoor garden.
  • Shelving Displays: Utilize open shelving to create a tiered display, with tall succulents on lower shelves and smaller plants above. This arrangement allows each plant to receive adequate light and creates a cascading green effect.
  • Botanical Room Divider: Use tall succulents as natural room dividers by placing several in a row. This not only adds greenery to your space but also subtly divides areas without blocking light or sightlines.
  • Tall Glass Containers: While traditional terrariums may not accommodate tall succulents, consider using large, tall glass containers, like aquariums or custom-built glass cases, to house a single specimen or a composition of tall succulents.
  • Open Air Terrariums: Create an open-air terrarium with a tall glass cylinder or a glass lantern that lacks one or more sides. This provides the humidity control needed for succulents while still framing them in an artistic manner.
  • Upcycled Items: Get creative with containers by repurposing items like tall baskets, metal tins, or even unused chimneys. These can add character and a personal touch to your succulent display.

How to Incorporate Tall Succulents Outdoors

tall succulents in a garden

Tall succulents offer a unique blend of architectural beauty and low-maintenance care, making them perfect candidates for enhancing outdoor gardens, balconies, and terraces. Their striking forms, varied textures, and ability to withstand tough conditions allow for creative and impactful landscaping designs.

  • Specimen Plants: Use tall succulents as specimen plants to create focal points in the garden. Their distinctive shapes draw the eye, and when positioned strategically, they can anchor a garden design, adding structure and interest.
  • Mixed Borders: Incorporate tall succulents into mixed borders alongside perennials, grasses, and shrubs. Their form contrasts beautifully with softer, leafier plants, adding texture and variety to the border.
  • Rock Gardens and Xeriscapes: Tall succulents are well-suited to rock gardens and xeriscaping, where their drought tolerance and striking forms complement the stones and other drought-resistant plantings, creating a cohesive, low-water landscape.
  • Container Gardening: For balconies and terraces, container gardening is an ideal way to display tall succulents. Large, sturdy pots or modern planter boxes can accommodate the root systems of tall succulents and allow for easy movement if conditions (like light or temperature) need to be adjusted.
  • Vertical Displays: Take advantage of vertical space by using tall plant stands or tiered shelving to display succulents. This can create a dramatic green backdrop that enhances privacy and brings a lush, garden feel to smaller outdoor areas.
  • Themed Plantings: Create a themed succulent garden in a large container or corner of your balcony, grouping tall succulents with other succulent varieties to simulate a desert landscape or sculptural garden.
  • Natural Screens: Tall succulents can be used as natural screens to provide privacy and wind protection. Planting a row of tall succulents along a border or edge of a terrace can create a living barrier that’s both functional and aesthetically pleasing.

Considerations

  • Weather Tolerance: While many tall succulents are heat and drought-tolerant, some may be sensitive to extreme cold or frost. In cooler climates, consider using containers for tall succulents that can be moved indoors or to a sheltered area during the winter months.
  • Growth Habits: Be mindful of the mature size and growth rate of tall succulents when incorporating them into your garden design. Allow enough space for them to grow to their full size without overcrowding.

Incorporating tall succulents into outdoor gardens, balconies, and terraces not only adds structural beauty and interest but also provides a practical, low-maintenance solution for year-round greenery. Their versatility and striking presence make them an excellent choice for enhancing a wide range of outdoor spaces.

17 tall succulent plants for your home Pinterest pin

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